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January 05, 2010

The Reflective Student: A Taxonomy of Reflection (Part II)

Reflection

Reflection can be a challenging endeavor. It's not something that's fostered in school - typically someone else tells you how you're doing! At best, students can narrate what they did, but have trouble thinking abstractly about their learning - patterns, connections and progress.

In an effort to help schools become more reflective learning environments, I've developed this "Taxonomy of Reflection" - modeled on Bloom's approach.  It's posted in four installments:

1.  A Taxonomy of  Reflection  
2. The Reflective Student
3. The Reflective Teacher
4.
The Reflective Principal 

See my Prezi tour of the Taxonomy

It's very much a work in progress, and I invite your comments and suggestions. I'm especially interested in whether you think the parallel construction to Bloom holds up through each of the three examples - student, teacher, and principals. I think all have something to learn from each perspective.


2. The Reflective Student

Each level of reflection is structured to parallel Bloom's taxonomy. (See installment 1 for more on the model). Assume that a student looked back on a project or assignment they had completed. What sample questions might they ask themselves as they move from lower to higher order reflection? (Note: I'm not suggesting that all questions are asked after every project - feel free to pick a few that work for you.)

Bloom's Remembering: What did I do?
Student Reflection: What was the assignment? When was it due? Did I get it turned in on time?

Bloom's Understanding: What was important about what I did? Did I meet my goals?
Student Reflection: Do I understand the parts of the assignment and how they connect? Did my response completely cover all parts of the assignment? Do I see where this fits in with what we are studying? 

Bloom's Application: When did I do this before? Where could I use this again?
Student Reflection: How was this assignment similar to other assignments? (in this course or others). Do I see connections in either content, product or process? Are there ways to adapt it to other assignments? Where could I use this (content, product or process) my life?

Bloom's Analysis: Do I see any patterns or relationships in what I did?
Student Reflection: Were the strategies, skills and procedures I used effective for this assignment? Do I see any patterns in how I approached my work - such as  following an outline, keeping to deadlines? What were the results of the approach I used - was it efficient, or could I have eliminated or reorganized steps?

Bloom's Evaluation: How well did I do? What worked? What do I need to improve?
Student Reflection: What are we learning and is it important? Did I do an effective job of communicating my learning to others? What have I learned about my strengths and my areas in need of improvement? How am I progressing as a learner?

Bloom's Creation: What should I do next? What's my plan / design? 
Student Reflection: How can I best use my strengths to improve? What steps should I take or resources should I use to meet my challenges? What suggestions do I have for my teacher or my peers to improve our learning environment? How can I adapt this content or skill to make a difference in my life?

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After working on a collaborative project, I had my class fill out a reflection sheet, based on Peter's ideas. When they had finished writing about it, I asked their response to doing the reflection. "I love writing a reflection. It finishes out the activity. It's like a period at the end."

Just what I was after!

Hi Peter,

Thank you for the comment on my blog. You requested the link and here it is.
http://ateacherswonderings.posterous.com/reflection-with-and-by-students

Christina, Thanks for adding the link to you post "Reflection with and by Students" It's an excellent collection of reflective prompts for elementary students - worth looking at!

Hi Peter,

Thanks for the link to your blog. I find student reflection such a fascinating area of learning and one that I constantly strive toward supporting in each child. Like you I also have attempted to map out the journey of reflective learning, here is my "work in progress." Any comments most welcome:

http://www.scribd.com/doc/38236032/A-Developmental-Model-of-Relfection

Gareth,
I looked at your reflective map in link above. Another great approach to reflection. I recommend it to my readers!
Thanks for posting! ~ Peter

I would like to thank the author for this marvelous efforts .I appreciate your efforts in preparing this post. I really like your blog articles.

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